Guru Nanak Ki Bani

Articles on Sikhism written by Sujan Singh


Sikhism was founded by Sri Guru Nanak Dev Ji over 500 years back. The followers of Sikhism are called Sikhs who were later christened by tenth guru, Sri Guru Govind Sing Ji as Khalsa in 1699 AD. Sikhs are guided by Guru Bani of Sri Guru Granth Saheb Ji deified as the guru of Sikhs by Sri Guru Govind Singh Ji during his life time.Sri Guru Granth Saheb Ji was compiled by fifth Sikh guru, Sri Guru Arjun Dev Ji and contains guru bani of seven gurus and eighteen saints. The selection of saints by guru ji for inclusion of their bani in Sri Guru Granth Saheb Ji was done solely on the basis that the basic principles in their bani were same as those in the bani of all the gurus. Sikh tenets do not believe in idol worship as well as the worship of tombs, mausoleums, trees, animals, gods and goddesses.  The leaders of some religious sects, however, tend to interpret guru bani in a way that suits their interests overlooking the basic principles of Sikhism. This website is created to interpret guru bani in right perspective for the guidance of Sikh youth as well as members of other communities who believe in Sikh tenets. 


+2 #1 Jatinder Kaur 2015-04-20 07:04
In what context the word "christened " used on this page, in the first line. I suppose it should be baptized.
Kindly advise/ comment.


Daily Hukamnama in English

  • SORAT’H, FIFTH MEHL, SECOND HOUSE, ASHTAPADEES: ONE UNIVERSAL CREATOR GOD. BY THE GRACE OF THE TRUE GURU: They read scriptures, and contemplate the Vedas; they practice the inner cleansing techniques of Yoga, and control of the breath. But they cannot escape from the company of the five passions; they are increasingly bound to egotism. || 1 || O Beloved, this is not the way to meet the Lord; I have performed these rituals so many times. I have collapsed, exhausted, at the Door of my Lord Master; I pray that He may grant me a discerning intellect. || Pause || One may remain silent and use his hands as begging bowls, and wander naked in the forest. He may make pilgrimages to river banks and sacred shrines all over the world, but his sense of duality will not leave him. || 2 || His mind’s desires may lead him to go and dwell at sacred places of pilgrimage, and offer his head to be sawn off; but this will not cause the filth of his mind to depart, even though he may make thousands of efforts. || 3 || He may give gifts of all sorts — gold, women, horses and elephants. He may make offerings of corn, clothes and land in abundance, but this will not lead him to the Lord’s Door. || 4 || He may remain devoted to worship and adoration, bowing his forehead to the floor, practicing the six religious rituals. He indulges in egotism and pride, and falls into entanglements, but he does not meet the Lord by these devices. || 5 || He practices the eighty-four postures of Yoga, and acquires the supernatural powers of the Siddhas, but he gets tired of practicing these. He lives a long life, but is reincarnated again and again; he has not met with the Lord. || 6 || He may enjoy princely pleasures, and regal pomp and ceremony, and issue unchallenged commands. He may lie on beautiful beds, perfumed with sandalwood oil, but this will led him only to the gates of the most horrible hell. || 7 || Singing the Kirtan of the Lord’s Praises in the Saadh Sangat, the Company of the Holy, is the highest of all actions. Says Nanak, he alone obtains it, who is pre-destined to receive it. || 8 || Your slave is intoxicated with this Love of Yours. The Destroyer of the pains of the poor has become merciful to me, and this mind is imbued with the Praises of the Lord, Har, Har. || Second Pause || 1 || 3 || Hukamnama from

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